Monday, March 30, 2009

Monday Roundup

Everyone else seems to post a beautiful spring picture to be inspired by - not me! Up here just outside of Boston, we still have some ice and snow in parking lots (although most of it is gone) and I have 2 crocuses that have just started to show a hint of color, but they're not open yet by any means. It was beautiful on Saturday, and if I had thought of it I probably could have gotten a nice picture somewhere, but I didn't, and it's pouring now (although it's 40 so we're all glad that it's not snow)! That's being a New Englander - whenever it rains you shrug and think - could be worse, could be snow.

In any case, it's a great day to snuggle up (with the heat still on, unfortunately) and read a book! What are you reading? Leave a comment to let us know.

I'm in the middle of a fantastic book right now - Sarah's Daughter, by Ruth Bass. Not technically a green read, it's the story of a 14 year old girl in the late 1800s who has to cope with life after her mother dies in an accident. She has a father who expects her to run the household, two siblings to take care of, and dreams of becoming a school teacher. It is so detailed and well written that it makes you feel like you're right there with her. Like the Little House series, it is a green read in the sense that you learn how people survived and thrived with so much less than we feel we need today. But mostly it's just a great book. I got halfway through and decided to read it aloud to my 10 year old daughter, so I'm not going to read ahead on my own - once we catch up to where I got to, we'll discover it together. I do realize how many small details I miss by reading quickly - when I have to read aloud I remember a lot more of the finer points, plus we really enjoy our nightly read and snuggle.

Any great books you can share with us - green or otherwise? And if you've read any books and reviewed them on your blog, please leave us the link and we'll put them up here so everyone can link to them easily. Have a great week!

12 comments:

Donna said...

Oooooh! That one sounds good!

Heather @ SGF said...

I started reading "Not Buying it" I'm not sure I like it, but it's interesting. A story about a woman who didn't buy anything but food for an entire year.

I finally finished Blithe Tomato though and LOVED IT! Will do a review on it later this week.

JAM said...

Donna - you'll love it, I'm sure.

Heather - I look forward to your review on Blithe Tomato. I read Not Buying It and enjoyed it, but didn't love everything about it, and there was another one that I can't remember the name of that I read that was more a "simplify your life" type of book where the author gave up a "vice" every month for that month, like buying coffee out, buying shoes, using the elevator, taking taxis (she lives in NYC), eating in restaurants, etc. It was very good. She went back to things after her month was up, but much more mindfully and usually to a much lesser extent. I wish I could remember what that one was called!

Heather @ SGF said...

I guess what I don't like about "Not Buying It" is it seems so whiny. At least so far, she's concentrating on everything she misses and all the hassles she has to go through. I guess I look at things differently. The extra time and effort it takes to do things opens up windows of opportunity to do for others and experience a different world than I normally would.

JAM said...

Yes, I'm totally with you on that. I never used to really consider myself a non-consumer type - I just hated shopping. I would try long and hard to avoid a store. I guess when you're writing a book about that you need some internal conflict so the publisher thinks it will interest people. We finally bought a new car and the salesman was making fun of me for the fact that in 6 years I've only put 12K mi on my car (not the one we replaced) and I said - where do I need to go? Violin lessons, orchestra practice, VERY occasionally food shopping (hubby stops on the way home from work or I walk). When you take shopping out of the equation I can walk almost everywhere I need to go, and there are many days I don't leave the house for anything but a run. I think Ruchi should write a book about her year of not buying new stuff - I'd love to read that!!!

kale for sale said...

I'm just finishing The Findhorn Garden by Paul Hawken. It was written in the 70's but so much of it continues to be relevant. The part I love is how they talked to the plants and the plants responded. I hope to write a review but have yet to get a review up of Refuge by Terry Tempest Williams. I'm just happy to be reading.

And thanks for the recommendation of Sarah's Daughter. I know a nine year old that would love it.

Heather @ SGF said...

JAM - I'm not a shopping person either and most of my errands can be done by bike, walking, or bus. Who needs a car? Once in a blue moon (maybe once every 2 months or so), I'll borrow my hubby's car, but that's usually only when I have to transport animals to the vet - they don't do the bike well :)

Heather @ SGF said...

Just posted "Blithe Tomato" today:

http://simple-green-frugal.blogspot.com/2009/04/blithe-tomato-book-review.html

Donna said...

Heather: I read "Not Buying It" a while back and I wasn't impressed, either. I'm not sure I even finished the book. I'll have to check out your Tomato review. :)

Heather @ SGF said...

Donna - I went ahead and wrote a review on it. It'll go up next Friday, I believe. I was disappointed, but it turns out Google Books offers a free read so if someone else is inspired, at least they can check it out.

I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who had higher expectations.

Going Crunchy said...

I'm reading Strategies for a Green Economy and another book on regular families getting ahead, financial freedom, etc. on regular incomes. Economics on my bedside table!

JAM said...

I just finished Sarah's Daughter and wanted to warn people that it is more appropriate for teens, not kids. I will either be skipping sections when I read to my 10 year old, or else have some explaining to do (and she knows more than most her age due to a much older sister). Still a fantastic book, but not quite on the benign level of Little House.